Ignore the Election Robocalls Telling You to Stay Home

Voters may receive suspicious calls deterring them from voting. If information is correct, local news and state governments should also carry the message. Report any robocalls to your state government.

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UPDATE 1:06PM EST
USPS ordered to sweep facilities to ensure no ballots have been held up and must be sent for immediate delivery in the listed regions. 

Prank calls from foreign-states are the latest election hurdle facing Americans. Robocalls have reached millions of Americans telling them to “stay safe and stay home.” Around 10 million calls featuring a female voicehave urged Americans to stay inside.

The chief spam-blocking officer for YouMail says the calls don’t mention the election but clearly aim to confuse people. “If you wanted to cause havoc in America for the elections, one way to do it is clearly robocalling. This whole thing is exposing [that] it can be very difficult to react quickly to a large calling volume campaign,” he remarked.

YouMail says the calls may be of foreign origin and have reached area codes in 280 and 317. There may be other affected area codes. The calls started in the summer and have ramped up since October.

Russia and Iran have both stolen voter registration information and attempted to intimidate voters. Both countries have denied the accusations.

People in Florida and Alaska got threatening emails associated with the far-right group, the Proud Boys, demanding people vote for Trump, or “we will come after you.” The Proud Boys deny any involvement in the messages.

Robocalls and voter intimidation has been a hot topic for the 2020 election. Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel (D) tweeted on the subject, saying people were told to come back on Wednesday due to long lines. This is false.

 

 

“Obviously this is FALSE and an effort to suppress the vote,” Nessel tweeted. “No long lines and today is the last day to vote. Don’t believe the lies! Have your voice heard! RT PLS.”

Nessel alerted the public to messages saying “there are ballot sensor issues.” She clarifies to assuage any doubt on the matter.

“Do not fall for it, it’s a trick!”she said. Earlier last month, authorities charged conservative strategists Jacob Wohl and Jack Burman in Michigan. The pair used a robocall scheme intended to drive down minority turnout at polls.

Authorities in Ohio indicted Burman and Wohl for intimidating residents out of voting by mail, warning recipients that their information might be used to pursue old warrants, collect outstanding debts and track people for mandatory vaccines. All of this is, of course, false.

If you receive any suspicious calls or have concerns, call your state government or check the website for voter information. In Michigan, visit https://www.michigan.gov/vote.

 

Information about voter fraud research.

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